Friday, November 10, 2006

Schroedinger's Dropped Comics

Redlib asks: "What comic have you dropped that you had the highest hopes for?" I was going to post a short answer, until it occurred to me that I didn't actually know the answer to it. For me, there's several levels of "drop", and it's not at all clear (even to me!) whether I've dropped a comic or not until well after the fact. These are my levels:

1. Pick it up monthly. There are a lot of comics in this category.

2a. Wait for the trade paperback. Currently, I've got all the Superman and Batman titles, as well as Fables and Green Lantern, in this category (because its cheaper). If, after a while, it looks like they are not going to promptly collect a story arc, I will definitely go back and collect the uncollected.

2b. Hope for the trade paperback. It might not be worth it to buy all the individual issues, so I will wait for the book. If there is no book coming out, then I'll go back and reconsider whether to buy the individual issues. Flash and Green Lantern Corps are currently in the category for me. I haven't bought them since #1 of the current run, but I haven't actually decided to drop them yet.

3. Drop until a slow week and reconsider. I wasn't terribly impressed with the Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters or OMAC minis. I didn't buy them after #1. Then, last week, there weren't many comics I wanted, and I had some extra money. I went back and bought Uncle Sam #2, #3, and #4. I didn't buy any of the OMACs, but there's plenty in the store, if I change my mind the next slow week.

4. Reconsider when the trade comes out. If I end up not buying the rest of the OMACs during a slow week, and they put out a trade paperback of it, I might buy that when it comes out. Or I might not. This is how I currently feel about the upcoming "Battle for Bludhaven" trade.

5. Drop. I don't want to book, and won't pick up the trade. I'm just not interested. Currently in this category for me is Nightwing and Hawkgirl.

Of course, there's a lot of flow back and forth between categories, based on the arc, the writer, and my mood that week.

How's that for a long answer to a short question!

5 Comments:

Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Ragtime,
This has nothing to do with this post, but Adam Bede is your favorite George Eliot?? I ask, because it's in your profile :)
I'd have to say Romola for me, or Daniel Deronda, or maybe even Mary Barton.
How do you feel about Elizabeth Gaskell?
Ciao,
Amy, always on the lookout for Victorian discussions ;)

2:25 PM  
Blogger Ragtime said...

Well, I'm not exactly a Victorian scholar, so my tastes tends to be a little eclectic. I've read all of Jane Austen, but only some of George Eliot, and I've only seen Daniel Deronda on Masterpiece Theatre, so it's not really fair to compare.

My Victorian tastes run more to the poetry (Keats and Wordsworth) for serious stuff. Jane Austen always just struck me as Cinderella for grown-ups. (Not that there's anythhing wrong with Cinderella for grown-ups!) Adam Bede was the most "Jane Austeny" or the Geroge Eliot stories -- updated a generation so that Cinderella had a job and wasn't actively searching for her prince charming.

6:36 AM  
Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Ragtime,
Well, I'm not exactly a Victorian scholar, so my tastes tends to be a little eclectic. I've read all of Jane Austen, but only some of George Eliot, and I've only seen Daniel Deronda on Masterpiece Theatre, so it's not really fair to compare.

It's very exciting to see George Eliot on anyone's favorite book list, Victorian scholar or no :) Out of the nineteenth-century writers, she's not warm and fluffy like Austen, or mainstream like M. Shelley, so she usually doesn't make those lists. Daniel Deronda's a great book, overall. Mary Barton's my favorite to read, and Romola, I think, is the prettiest, both for imagery and language.

My Victorian tastes run more to the poetry (Keats and Wordsworth) for serious stuff. Jane Austen always just struck me as Cinderella for grown-ups. (Not that there's anythhing wrong with Cinderella for grown-ups!)

Have you read Persuasion? That's my favorite Austen. But if you're looking for a nice medium between Austen (beginning of the novel of manners/social novel genre) and Eliot (queen of the social novel genre), I suggest Gaskell, who is my favorite 19th century writer, hands down.

Adam Bede was the most "Jane Austeny" or the Geroge Eliot stories -- updated a generation so that Cinderella had a job and wasn't actively searching for her prince charming.

What a great description :) I also like North and South for those reasons, but Mary Barton, I'm afraid, speaks to something else entirely. Try Gaskell, particularly Cranford (tied with Wives and Daughters for my favorite), if you get the chance, if you haven't already, that is!
Ciao,
Amy

9:12 PM  
Blogger Ragtime said...

I have read Persuasion, but it's not coming to me now. Probably time for a re-read!

Thank you for the recommendations. They were certainly be added to my (expanding!) to-read list.

1:42 PM  
Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Ragtime,
Egad, my brain is mushy.

I said, Mary Barton's my favorite to read, and Romola, I think, is the prettiest, both for imagery and language.

Mary Barton is Elizabeth Gaskell. I meant to say Mill on the Floss is my favorite to read, but apparently that's not really true since I can't even remember the name!!
(very, very long week)

I have read Persuasion, but it's not coming to me now. Probably time for a re-read!

The movie, too, is the best adaptation of all of them, I think.

Thank you for the recommendations. They were certainly be added to my (expanding!) to-read list.

You're welcome! Always ready to share the love of Gaskell. Half my dissertation's on her, after all...

Sorry for the goof! My brain so crazy lately even the zombies reject it. :)
Ciao,
Amy

8:42 PM  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home